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The Virtual Staffroom Podcast

Episode 6: EduTECH Special - The year 2041: students, success and the skills they require

 

Joachim Cohen:

Welcome to The Virtual Staffroom. A podcast made for teachers, by teachers, and all with a dash of educational technology thrown in. Drum roll please. Listeners, this is no ordinary edition of the podcast. I want to welcome you to our first ever EduTECH special. We are live recording this during day one of the virtual conference to celebrate this educational technology extravaganza. My name is Joachim Cohen, your host, and the school's technology innovation lead with the Technology 4 Learning team here at the New South Wales Department of Education.

 

Joachim Cohen:

And I'm honored today like every episode to be joined by two members of a Technology 4 Learning team, Yvette and Linda, as we talk all things EduTECH. Yvette works on magazine.T4L, is a Google certified innovator, an English teacher and a writer. You are such a techspert Yvette. Sum up day one in a sentence for me.

 

Yvette Poshoglian:

Well, Joe, it's a bit different. Normally you and I are running around the floor with mics in hand, interviewing poor hapless souls like Linda about their experience during EduTECH right at the end of the day. So it's quite different to have tuned in virtually and looked at the sessions. We've been watching the feedback coming through. So it's been certainly like my first full day of a virtual conference, very different. But different inspiring in a different way. I think there's time to make notes while you're not juggling something on your lap. So yeah, I'd be interested to know your thoughts. What do you think?

 

Joachim Cohen:

Yeah, absolutely. Oh gosh, I was actually just thinking back then when you were talking about running around with a camera and a microphone, how much I love the energy and connecting with people which a lot of conferences are all about. But you're right, in a virtual platform you can do that as well and actually probably take in a little bit more and do a lot more reflection. I really agree.

 

Joachim Cohen:

Now we're also joined today by Linda. Linda is a former primary school teacher, a STEMspert being the leader of the stem.T4L team we are all sperts today. And fittingly Linda, you have been talking all about the impact of STEM in the classroom today. What has day one been like for you?

 

Linda Lazenby:

Well, I think you just made up a word, so that was kind of exciting. The day has been great. A little less exhausting I would say than the real EduTECH, less sore feet, but I'm really excited for what tomorrow holds as well.

 

Joachim Cohen:

Oh, absolutely. Yes indeed. Another day ahead. So, what's in store though on the Virtual Staffroom. We are in a professional learning overload. We're buzzing with excitement as you can already tell and we've got so many stories of inspiration to share with you. I think it's safe to say, we are totally wrapped up in EduTECH fever. But for the first time ever, we are not at a conference centre. There are no expo halls filled with people and all the latest gadgets, but I can tell you all around new South Wales, Australia and the globe, people have been tuning in online to some amazing thought leaders, school change makers, and total Ed techsperts. But enough talk, what do we have in store for you today? First, we chat everything that's caught our eye on day one of EduTECH.

 

Joachim Cohen:

And then the main event, we get the chance to hear from a true education visionary. I like to think of him as an educational futurist. The one, the only Richard Gerver. As we open a window into the future and consider what the world will look like in 2040 and the impact on the classrooms of today. As we tackle the topic, The year is 2041, what are the skills our students need to succeed? And don't forget, this is our first EduTECH special. We have another awesome edition in the works for day two, tomorrow. Make sure you subscribe to get it as soon as it's released. So team Supreme, that's Linda and Yvette, are you ready to launch?

 

Linda Lazenby:

Absolutely.

 

Joachim Cohen:

Now it is no secret Yvette, Linda and I love to learn and love a conference. Going virtual in 2020 has as Yvette said, we can actually attend even more sessions than before. No finding rooms, no getting lost on travelators to nowhere. And Yvette and Linda, as I take off my headphones and shut down my computer after day one, I'm brimming with ideas and excitement. But how about you two? What blew you away today Linda?

 

Linda Lazenby:

Well, the session that was on this afternoon that I tuned into was one by the STEM team. Of course, it was a robots toy or tool session and they walked through Lego Spike which was new at EduTECH last year and then there was quite a delay in getting it into the country. So, STEM have just finished a pilot with about six schools, so they walked through how to use that and a little bit more on other robotics in our kids but a really simple session if you're wondering kind of where robotics might fit in at your school. So I'd recommend people go back and watch that on demand.

 

Yvette Poshoglian:

Okay. And what is different about the Spike? I mean, I remember seeing it last year, but how is it used differently in the classroom or what's potential?

 

Linda Lazenby:

Yeah, well it's the target age that it's really filling that gap of that kind of middle years, three to five-ish, year three to year five, so it just kind of fills that gap a little bit in the market that Lego had there, but also has different functionality, different movements and different skills kids can pick up as well.

 

Yvette Poshoglian:

Okay.

 

Joachim Cohen:

Now I love the title of that session. I don't know about your toy or tool. I think it's both.

 

Linda Lazenby:

Absolutely.

 

Joachim Cohen:

Yeah, that's what they kind of thought and came to.

 

Linda Lazenby:

Yeah, definitely. Yeah.

 

Joachim Cohen:

Exciting. I've got to go back and watch that one on demand.

 

Yvette Poshoglian:

Look, one of the highlights for me today was the school magazine session. Now as a kid that grew up with it and read it and it's still a fantastic resource. It celebrated its 100 year anniversary a couple of years ago. I'm sure you remember it. It's an essential literacy, literature tool. It's the only magazine of its kind published in Australia and actually to my knowledge, the world full of stories and poems and plays, all original new work that's coming out all the time across stages.

 

Yvette Poshoglian:

So the school magazine is actually got its own digital resource as well. I mean, it's now available online, but the team really took us through the resources. There are lots and lots of teachers notes on certain works, their profiles on certain authors and playwrights and artists some in the art alone in some of those issues of the school magazine, just incredible. But also short videos and how to use it as a teaching tool in the classroom.

 

Yvette Poshoglian:

So you may not have known that there was that element to the school magazine, but I'd really recommend you check out that if you're a primary school teacher or if you're an English teacher, it might be something... Or an EAL/D teacher, it might be something you could really use with your students. And it's all there online for you. And we've got the link to the resources there too.

 

Joachim Cohen:

I think every one of us who went to school in New South Wales and even beyond has heard of that school magazine and you're right, sometimes we forget about those gems of resources. And it sounds like at EduTECH you've really been able to rediscover.

 

Yvette Poshoglian:

Yeah. I think the team really unpacked it beautifully because I mean, I know that it's a digital resource but I think the fact that you can have it straight there into the classroom, you can have the paper edition, you can have the hard copy and now you can actually go deeper by really exploring literary features of writing and they've yeah, It's really worth checking out.

 

Joachim Cohen:

Fantastic. Well, I had an amazing day as well. And I think one that stood out for me was by Libby Jones and she's one of our rural and distance amazing educators. And she did a presentation called App Design Is For Appsolutely Everyone. I just love that title to begin with.

 

Yvette Poshoglian:

I see what you did there!

 

Joachim Cohen:

I know there's steamtastic, appsolutely, appsolutely everyone

 

Joachim Cohen:

It is full of lots of corny terms today but this session was fabulous. It blew me away because it uses a tool that we use every day, I'm not going to give it all the way you have to go and watch it. But it's not just about the technicalities behind an app, but it's actually all about the design thinking and the prototyping that goes into the development of an app. So it's something that you can apply in so many different curriculum areas and Libby walked through that process with people and also showing them a few of the technology tools that they could use.

 

Joachim Cohen:

So it was a really empowering session and I was just reflecting on my time in the commerce and business studies' classroom and thought, wow, I can actually link this into entrepreneurship and get students to prototype and then pitch an app after watching this session. So it was a real hour of power for me. And I really encourage everyone to go and listen to that one on demand.

 

Yvette Poshoglian:

So you is app design something that's predominantly for secondary students or is it being done in younger years?

 

Joachim Cohen:

It's really a great question.

 

Linda Lazenby:

Yeah, you could definitely build it into your five and six, where it meets their needs obviously, but I think it's just so exciting for kids to have that opportunity to take an idea and go that one step further and look at that app design a bit more closely.

 

Joachim Cohen:

Absolutely. It's kind of like the poster of 2021.

 

Linda Lazenby:

Yeah. I'll put it on my on demand list.

 

Joachim Cohen:

Absolutely, that's for sure. So don't forget, as we're saying, if you missed any of those sessions or you wish you had attended all of those sessions, they are available on demand during term four as well as school development days in term one, 2021. And if you hadn't heard, there are two of those as well. So you've got a couple that you might be able to start planning for with these EduTECH sessions.

 

Joachim Cohen:

Now it's the moment you've all been waiting for. We're set to be joined by someone who has their finger on all the latest trends in education and will help us prepare for the future, Richard Gerver. Now Richard is a former principal of the Grange primary school, where he led an inspirational transformation. In his most recent book, 'Education A Manifesto For Change', he considers how classrooms and schools can be transformed for what no one can deny is a turbulent 21st century.

 

Joachim Cohen:

So team, I don't think there is anyone I would rather jump into the DeLorean with here at the virtual staff room. Hold on tight everyone, buckle up those safety belts, we are picking up speed, the view is becoming blurry. Here we are. The year is 2041. What are the students, what are the skills rather our students need to succeed. Richard, we are so honored and very lucky to have you join us today. Welcome.

 

Richard Gerver:

It's brilliant to be with you. Thanks for having me and what a build up by the way. All I can think of now is the hoverboard in back to the future.

 

Joachim Cohen:

That's it. Exactly right. That's the way we're heading. And then we're all here at EduTECH at the moment, Richard, and what has your experience been so far of this awesome conference?

 

Richard Gerver:

I've hovered around the periphery of EduTECH a couple of times actually. In fact, last year very poignantly, I know one of the great mega stars and my dear friend and mentor who passed away recently, Sir Ken Robinson, gave one of his last big speeches and actually we had dinner the night after his event. So EduTECH has a special kind of poignance for me this year because the last time I saw Ken was over dinner outside the convention hall in Sydney. But one of the things that has always struck me about EduTECH, firstly, is the networking, the power of collaboration, educators coming together from so many corners of the world. People who are all committed and interested not just in educating their children for the now, but actually doing the best they can to understand trends and values to make sure we do the best for our kids in the future. So it's an unbelievable melting pot both of people, ideas and of passions.

 

Yvette Poshoglian:

Richard, it's Yvette here. On that note, being a change guru and somebody who works in this area of innovation and leadership, look, we've all been through a lot of change and it's impacted all of us in 2020. How is it impacting the teaching profession? How has it impacted you?

 

Richard Gerver:

Well, I mean, I think this is a really interesting point and what we've seen with the COVID crisis is in a way it's been an accelerant, an amplifier of what I think has been happening pretty much for two or three decades now. Really, we've been talking about preparing young people for a very different future for a very long time. And we've had a number of events just in the last what, 15 years that have catalyzed that. First we had the global economic crisis and now we've got this global pandemic.

 

Richard Gerver:

And I think the really interesting thing for me is every time we encounter a moment of profound unplanned change, how badly prepared emotionally we are as people to be able to deal with uncertainty and change. Now I'm not in any way trying to diminish or belittle the extraordinary suffering and nature of what we're living through right now, but it does always highlight to us that in many ways throughout our lives we've all been prepared to seek out and cling on to certainty. In many ways it's the way the education system works. It's predicated on making sure we funnel kids through the right pathway for them and the promise at the end of that pathway should they get their head down and and work towards it, is certainty. A job, a salary, a mortgage, a home, eventually a decent pension.

 

Richard Gerver:

And I think for many of us those things haven't come to pass and in a way COVID has been that accelerant that has really amplified that to so many of us, including me. I spend a lot of my life these days traveling, speaking at major conferences like EduTECH and March came along and all of a sudden I was grounded. I couldn't travel, I couldn't stand on stages, I couldn't talk to people and you have to start a process of reinvention. And like a lot of people and a lot of our kids and a lot of our teachers, I found that process incredibly daunting at first. I entered a kind of stage of paralysis where really nothing went in, I couldn't absorb information. Then I went into a short period of denial where I refused to believe this thing was really going to hit hard or for as long as it had, that it would go away sort of trumpian like in that it mystically just disappear.

 

Richard Gerver:

When that didn't happen, I became angry, I became angry at politicians, at Wuhan. I became angry at my neighbors for breaking lockdown rules. And when that didn't make me feel any better, I suppose I, like a lot of people experienced that kind of emotional slump where I just kind of fell into a state of listlessness, that kind of absence of hope.

 

Richard Gerver:

And I think the key really as a message for educators is this is very much the pattern of change, maybe not as amplified as we've seen with COVID. But those emotional states tend to be the way that we as teachers feel often when change is imposed on us and when kids feel they're out of control. And really the key, the answer to that is to get your head up as fast as you can, fire up your curiosity and at least start to ask questions about the situations you find yourself in. So I think for me the critical lesson for us as educators moving forward, is to make sure that we don't deliver education experiences that tell our kids life is certain but actually ensure that we catalyse their ability to be curious and to constantly ask questions.

 

Linda Lazenby:

And look, that's been quite the journey and it's good to know that all those feelings that you kind of described there is how everyone has been feeling this year across the world really. So on the back of all of that change you've talked about, what do you think things will look like, say as Joe had said in 2040, 20 years from now, which parts of those change do you think will have long-term impact on us all?

 

Richard Gerver:

Well, I think this will now... I think this will define... The shared experience of this year will, define the global generation, probably two or three generations. But I think what's really important is that we have gleaned from this year, that we can survive more than we ever believed we could. If somebody had said that there would be a global pandemic that would shut the world down and all the things that would happen would happen, I don't think any of us or many of us would have trusted ourselves to not just come through it, but innovate through it.

 

Richard Gerver:

And I think we've seen unbelievable patterns of innovation in education. The very fact that schools and teachers have switched their entire industry to online and blended learning for periods of time has been an extraordinary thing. So I think the first thing and very optimistically is, whenever you go through a period of great adversity you come out the other side feeling stronger and more confident that you can take on the world.

 

Richard Gerver:

So I think there'll be actually perversely an increased personal level of confidence. And I think we need to feed into that in education. I think that actually one of the lessons we've learned is how important it is that we teach young people to be able to self-manage and self-lead and self-regulate. And again, I think they've stepped up to the mark. So I think that's going to have a profound impact on education.

 

Richard Gerver:

I also think and I think it's really pertinent we talk about this given that we're EduTECH, that the taboos and fear around so many in our profession around the adoption of technology will now have diminished, but I think we've become far more real about it. Technology is not the silver bullet. It isn't the answer, but it is a wonderful catalyst and tool used properly. And I think as a profession now we are going to fear it less. We understand both its abilities and its limitations more. And I think therefore what we'll see over the next 20 years into somewhere like 2040, 2041 is a much greater understanding of how to blend technology with the human experience that is education.

 

Joachim Cohen:

Wow. I'm really liking the picture that I think you're painting of what education in the world and schooling will look like in 2041. And I think you've started to unpack this a little bit for us already, Richard, but what are those core or key skills that you think our students of today will need to be able to thrive in that world of 2041?

 

Richard Gerver:

It's really interesting because way back actually in 2013, the OECD, they are those same critters that produced the PISA international league tables that we all love so much, produced a really interesting report. The first of its time, the first of its kind, which was a global report into the links between education, employability and skills. And one of the key things that that report highlighted was having talked to two or 3000 of the world's biggest employers, was that the most important qualities that young people can have moving forward out of education and into the workplace are the abilities to through their lives, learn, adapt, and change.

 

Richard Gerver:

And I think again, what's really interesting is the last few months, the events of this year have highlighted that to us. But I think those are going to be crucial skills moving forward and certainly over the next couple of decades. That ability for people to tap in with confidence into learning opportunities, not just until they're 16, 18 or 21, but right the way through their lives. To be able to train and retrain, to skill and reskill, to update and change their knowledge banks, is going to be vital. Their ability to be adaptive to that change without fear and step into the possibilities of it.

 

Richard Gerver:

And I think also on top of those things, we're going to need people to be incredibly human. Those soft skills, which I absolutely believe are becoming harder and harder currency, will by 2041 be absolutely the pinnacle things. So for example, when you find out that recently the law society in the UK has said that they're going to start training to become a lawyer without the need to go to university and get a degree. When you've got major corporations like Ernst & Young and Price Waterhouse Coopers saying actually, we're going to start taking kids at 18, at school age into our organisations and not make them go through higher education because the premium quality they're all beginning to understand is the soft skills that people possess.

 

Richard Gerver:

Those interpersonal skills which are increasingly important because what they're realizing is with a mix of technology and also much sharper training practices, you can teach technical skills really very, very quickly. Price Waterhouse Coopers for example, think they can teach the right young candidates in six weeks what it took them three years to study and learn at university. So I think we're going to see a very, very different kind of environment but one that I hope is focused far more now on the development of the human being in three dimensions.

 

Linda Lazenby:

So look we've walked through the change that has impacted us this year and the skills that our young people need, how can schools respond and what do you think learning in a school environment will look like based on that?

 

Richard Gerver:

Well, again, I think schools are already adapting and I think whether they realise it or not, the shared experience that they've had over the last few months is really important in helping them move forwards. And one of the things I urge educators and school leaders to think about, as hopefully we come out of this, and I know for sure that Australia and the Southern hemisphere are doing much better at the moment than we are, so that's hopefully a closer hope for you, that we don't just suddenly spring back to what normal was but we take time to pause and reflect on some of the new ways of working and more importantly the new things we've learned about education and we carry that forward into 2041, 2040, 2041.

 

Richard Gerver:

One thing that I've been very passionate about for a number of years and I think is really, really important is to remember actually that educators are experts in translating really tough concepts and knowledge into content that becomes accessible for young people. And what we've got to stop doing is putting the pressure on ourselves to believe that we have to find the content and the specific knowledge and skills to teach our kids.

 

Richard Gerver:

And therefore, what I'd love to see is that schools and colleges become hubs of learning. We go back to that older African proverb, it takes a village to raise a child, and we start to welcome in more and more expertise from across different fields into the education environment. Again, we were talking off air before we started today about some of the magic that's come out of this kind of online virtual conference and learning experience because it's actually given people access to a whole host of new experts, new voices and new experiences they would never have if we hadn't had to create this online environment in the way we have. And I think by 2040, 2041, schools will be able to welcome in guest experts, whether it's scientists or tech experts, athletes, people from the arts, people from business communities to work more directly with their students. So what I'd love to see is schools taking advantage of that opportunity and becoming real hubs of a broader education and experience for young people.

 

Yvette Poshoglian:

Richard, those who've attended EduTECH today are going to be pumped full of information. They're going to come out after tomorrow full of new ideas, wanting to learn about new tech and following up what they can purchase for their school, but what do they really need to effect change in their schools tomorrow? Is it a mindset thing? What is it that they need to do to take back and really try and energize their staff, their students, their executive? What are we thinking they're going to do? What do they need to do?

 

Richard Gerver:

I'll tell you what I don't think they should do. That's going to be a good place to start with. We've got to be very careful. Teachers are very attracted like magpies to shiny things, shiny new thing. We like shiny new things. And we're desperately scrabbling around for the silver bullets to find the answer, the quick answers to some of the issues we're talking about. And we've got to be very careful. And by the way, I'm not decrying tech or the experiences and the new stuff coming out, but we've got to be very careful that we don't just scoop it all up and go, there's the answer. Because the other thing is the attendees at EduTECH know that their colleagues who haven't attended EduTECH are dreading them going back into school in the next few days, right? Because they know they're going to come fired back with a million new things and the other teachers in the school are going to be going, Oh God, not something else that we have to layer on top of everything else we're already doing.

 

Richard Gerver:

And in many ways, over the last 20 or 30 years, so much of the story of innovation in education has felt like that. And to an extent it's felt like that because we keep trying to layer new ideas on top of everything else we're already doing. So it never feels exciting or around the pinnacle of innovation. It just feels for most teachers like actually you're going to make us do more stuff on top of everything else.

 

Richard Gerver:

And I think that the really important suggestion I have for people is to take a breath, absorb the experiences, absorb the people you've heard, absorb the wonderful technology and innovations that you've experienced and seen. And then go back into school and go back to the very basics and start with one very simple, fundamental question, which is what do we want our children to look like as human beings when they leave us? And then return to the shiny things and the great ideas and the stimulus you've had here at EduTECH and say, now, based on the clarity of purpose we've developed for our kids in our community and the development we want to make for them as human beings, what and how can this technology and innovation support us?

 

Richard Gerver:

A few years ago, I was very, very lucky. I had the opportunity to have lunch with Eric Schmidt who at the time was the executive chairman of Google. And I asked him what I thought was going to be a real debate starter, a controversial question given that the fields we were in. I said," Do you ever see a time where technology will replace the teacher?" And I thought this is going to be a really great hot discussion over while he was eating lettuce because he's from California and I was eating steak and drinking beer because I'm from London. And we were sat there and his answer was immediate and unequivocable. He said," No, never." And I said, "Wow, that's extraordinary. Talk me through that." And he said, "Richard, really, you have to understand technology is an unbelievable tool. It is a catalyst."

 

Richard Gerver:

He said, "Actually, the best way to describe it is Google's foundational vision, which was to organise the world's information, make it accessible for everybody. And by so doing diminishing evil." What they meant by that was you could democratise information in a whole new way to a whole range of people around the world. And I think that's absolutely true, but what he went on to say was, but you have to remember that education has always been and will always be about the development of human beings. And in order to develop human beings, you will always need high levels of human interaction.

 

Joachim Cohen:

Absolutely. Yeah. Hear, hear. What an outstanding message that's for sure. Richard, and look, we're getting to the end of our exciting podcast here today, and we've got a really awesome day of EduTECH ahead for all of our listeners. Do you have a little bit of advice on a session that all of our listeners might want to attend?

 

Richard Gerver:

Oh wow. Absolutely, entirely, selfishly, they've got to come to mine. What can I say?

 

Joachim Cohen:

we've all bookmarked it I can tell you.

 

Richard Gerver:

But listen, what I would suggest is people don't overthink it. I'm not going to give you one particular answer obviously apart from Richard Gerver. But what I would say to people is don't overthink it. Don't go to the stuff you think other people want you to go to. Don't go to the stuff that you think you should go to because that's the sort of thing somebody like you should go to. It's been a tough year, probably the toughest and it's why EduTECH, has come at such a wonderful moment and is such a beacon.

 

Richard Gerver:

So go be a little bit selfish. Don't pick up on the stuff you think everyone expects you to go to or wants you to go to. Go to stuff that just interests you. And if you can, go to something that is maybe out of your comfort zone, that isn't in your realm of experience, because it's only through listening to new people or having new experiences that you actually stimulate your own innovation and creativity capacity. So step out your comfort zone, go and find something you wouldn't necessarily go to. Indulge the selfishness and just immerse yourself in the possibility and joy of what's up for today.

 

Yvette Poshoglian:

Oh, great advice. Look, talking about stepping outside of your comfort zone, I'm going to put a question to Richard and we may or may not have borrowed this from the very popular Desert Island Discs program, we ask all our guests what piece of technology they would take if they had the chance to go into space on a rocket. Putting you on the spot, what would you take with you?

 

Richard Gerver:

There's a whole lot of questions I need to fire back with you about what's available, but I mean, to be... I suppose the really simple answer is anything I can play music on. As long as I can take Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin and Sammy Davis Jr. into space with me, I'll be a very happy bunny. But if I can take a tablet and there's internet access then that's the device for me because also, and don't tell my family this, my second priority would be able to chat to them and at least look at pictures of them. So Dean Martin, Sammy Davis Jr. and Frank Sinatra first, and then a laptop to talk to my family second. But if they happen to listen to this, it's obviously the other way round.

 

Yvette Poshoglian:

Of course, we'll work that out in post, Richard. Thanks.

 

Joachim Cohen:

Thank you so much Richard. We are so so lucky to have had you join us today and all the way from the UK. This is one of the few benefits as you've said of these tumultuous times. You've really made us think, helped us to breathe, to pause and to reflect and to realise we can begin by just taking some small steps on the road. And also given us a little nudge to step out of our conference comfort zone and be a little bit selfish. Please take care, you and everyone in the UK and across the world are in thoughts.

 

Richard Gerver:

Thank you so much. And honestly, it's been an honor to be with you all. I hope everyone dives into a fantastic day at EduTECH and I hope to catch up with you maybe physically this time next year, fingers crossed.

 

Joachim Cohen:

Thanks Richard.

 

Richard Gerver:

Take care.

 

Joachim Cohen:

No. Don't skip to the next podcast or remove your headphones. We still have one more little gem to share. We have to give you your homework, but it's easy. Hit subscribe. Yes. We want you to tune in tomorrow as we jump out of a DeLorean and into the rollercoaster that it has been 2020 and see where it might take us in 2021 with renowned education expert, Professor Pasi Sahlberg. Yes, you heard right. Professor Pasi Sahlberg from UNSW's Gonski Institute of Education. Listeners, get ready to be inspired even more if that's possible. Yvette and Linda, how you feeling? Are you looking forward to another amazing day tomorrow?

 

Linda Lazenby:

Absolutely I am.

 

Yvette Poshoglian:

My legs aren't dead, so yes.

 

Joachim Cohen:

Have you marked those sessions?

 

Yvette Poshoglian:

Yes we have.

 

Linda Lazenby:

Agenda is loaded.

 

Joachim Cohen:

Fantastic. And everyone out there, it's been truly awesome to catch up and talk all things EduTECH. And listeners whilst normally, we would all have been able to get together, chat, celebrate over a meal after the first day of the conference, we hope this might've given you the chance to reflect, to consider and get set for day two. We will see you there.

 

Yvette Poshoglian:

Just a little note. Please be aware that all views expressed by the podcast presenters, that's us, are our personal opinions and not representative of the New South Wales Department of Education. Discussions aren't endorsements of third party products, services, or events. And please note that as much as we sound like it, we are not experts in legalese, tech speak or anything in between. We're just passionate people keen to boost technology for learning in the classroom and to help build the skills in your students and for you to solve the problems of tomorrow. Do your due diligence, read further and if we've got something wrong let us know. We too are always learning and always improving.

 

Joachim Cohen:

This Podcast has been produced by the masterful Jacob Druce with the assistance and supreme coordination of many awesome members of our T4L team. Remember, we look forward to seeing you tomorrow. So please press subscribe so you get the next edition in your inbox as soon its released. Now a final word, if you like the podcast give us a rating so more and more educators find us and share with your colleagues and friends so they too can be inspired to get a little techie in the classroom. Stay compassionate everyone. Thanks for joining us.