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Episode eighteen

The Virtual Staffroom Podcast

Episode 18 – Resilience and rising from the ashes – guest Kathy Powzun

 

Joachim Cohen:

Welcome to the Virtual Staffroom. A podcast made for teachers, by teachers and all with a dash of educational technology thrown in. My name is Joachim Cohen and today like every day, I'm joined by two rather awesome members of the Technology 4 Learning team. Linda Lazenby and Yvette Poshoglian.

 

Linda Lazenby:

Hey Joe.

 

Joachim Cohen:

So what do we have in store for you today? Well earlier this term, the team were privileged to be able to attend the Department of Education's Bushfire Relief Phoenix conference. A conference organised to give school teachers and leaders who were impacted by the devastating floods and fires over the last few years the opportunity to share, to reflect and to think about how they're going to build back better and stronger in 2021. But not everyone was able to attend and we wanted to give everyone a chance to hear the stories, have some time to reflect and also share some ways technology can inspire reflection, processing, storytelling and a new beginning. Now today we are lucky enough to be joined by the person behind this inspirational project. Executive Director of the Bushfire Relief Strategy, Kathy Powzun. But before we hear from Kathy, let's have a listen to some of the teachers, the principals, some of the special guests, their thoughts and their reflections and how technology has played an integral role. Yvette was down on the ground to capture some vox pops.

 

Yvette Poshoglian:

Okay, so I'm with Simon Marnie. Simon your with the ABC and you're an integral part of Phoenix conference. How do you feel about this conference for teachers and particularly, give us some insight of how you went through the bushfires with your line of work?

 

Simon Marnie:

Firstly as far as the conference goes, I can't believe the lineup of not just the speakers like Sir Peter Cosgrove and Shane Fitzsimmons, but then the workshops where you've got people from Headspace and those who really are at the coalface of helping communities rebuild after trauma. And that can be floods, it can be fire, it can even be COVID. And we've seen how the school system through their podcasting, through their communications, has really been at the forefront of community resilience.

 

Yvette Poshoglian:

Look, for a lot of principals coming together today and school staff, this is their first chance that they're going to have to talk through what they've experienced. I think we're going to hear some interesting stories today of resilience and experience.

 

Simon Marnie:

I think it's going to be a dual edged sword. I think that for many it will be re-entering the world that was really stressful for them and it will bring back memories. But the other side of the coin is that this is an opportunity just to say well done and to look around at their comrades and their fellow teachers and go we did this. We were there when it was happening and look, give yourself a pat on the back.

 

Yvette Poshoglian:

So much of today, what will come about is hearing about how young people went through these experiences and maybe what we can learn from how they tackle these or continue to tackle bigger issues in their community and their lives. How does that make you feel?

 

Simon Marnie:

I always remember Karl Kruszelnicki saying the reason he was a child doctor was because kids wanted to get better. And what we noticed when we were doing the recovery broadcast was that often the kids in the schools with the conduit through their parents and the teachers, to describing the general mental well-being of that community. And so teachers had a really important role in looking at the kids, transposing that into their family life and then seeing how the general mental health of each community was. So, kids are vital canaries in the coal mine when it comes to that.

 

Yvette Poshoglian:

And as a journo and a broadcaster particularly in the emergency broadcasting area, did that affect you personally or have there been lessons that you've taken on board as a team as to how you respond to things? Because we all rely too heavily on the ABC coverage.

 

Simon Marnie:

I think what the take home message for me and most of the other ABC people that covered that was just humility. We were fed by our audience to be able to do the coverage both as the bushfires and the floods were hitting, but even more importantly through doing stories and meeting the people and having the opportunity for people to tell their story, for us was a privilege and something that I won't forget for a long time.

 

Yvette Poshoglian:

Thank you so much Simon.

 

Simon Marnie:

Pleasure.

 

Yvette Poshoglian:

I'm with Sue Murray, the student voice coordinator of Phoenix conference. Sue, how interesting has it been hearing school stories that you've been collecting and working with from affected schools?

 

Sue Mary:

Oh it's been beyond interesting. It's been so moving and so inspiring. I found it... Not just the written stories, but the artwork that has really captured the spirit of students' responses to the changes in the world that they've known. It's been magnificent.

 

Yvette Poshoglian:

And there's been so many different art forms as you mentioned. There's been stories of different forms, images captured if not created. What role do you think technology can play in bringing those stories forward?

 

Sue Mary:

Well I think luckily for us to connect all the dots on the Bush fire and flood impacted maps, we can use things like a Google site online exhibition that will be hopefully curating where we can share videos of students performing, we can share science experiments kids have created we can share, I know that the podcast has been created at one school... we can show heartfelt direct stories from the heart, as well as very creative responses all through online experiences that technology is readily available to use.

 

Yvette Poshoglian:

Thanks Sue.

 

Yvette Poshoglian:

Okay. I'm with Leah Martin, the principal of Pambula Public School. Leah, can you tell us a little bit about your school, it's size and location?

 

Leah Martin:

Sure. Pambula is on the far South Coast of New South Wales. We are a school of about 350 kids, we've got 16 classes including three support classes and it's the best school in the state.

 

Yvette Poshoglian:

And your school went through a lot, you were very close to the fire zone. You're still dealing with some of the fallout of that experience. How can project Phoenix, the Phoenix conference help you take strategies back to your school?

 

Leah Martin:

Sure. I think firstly it's great to make those connections again with our colleagues and there's some amazing, inspiring presenters here as well. It's a really good chance for us to reset and really think about how we can move forward. And there's lots of information that we're getting, but the connection with people is probably the most important thing.

 

Leah Martin:

Technology has helped us immeasurably over the last 12 months and we've come such a long way, our staff and students and families. There's certainly a lot of opportunities for us to use that technology in a continuing way and we've really started to reimagine what connecting with other people looks like because of how we use technology. So for me and for my school, I think that's something that we're going to look at, how can we maximise that. After we came back from learning from home last year, we maintained some of the strategies that we were using. Particularly for students in learning support interventions. We actually found the way that they worked on Zoom to be more effective than what they were doing in-person because they were away from distraction. So we're looking at ways that we can continue some of those strategies moving forward.

 

Yvette Poshoglian:

Fantastic. And what about working with your staff and giving them the support they need or guidance and the leadership in this space. With this conference, what can you take back?

 

Leah Martin:

So much. I think something that was so great for us in terms of technology last year just before COVID, as the smoke was still in the air from the Bush fires, we had the T4L Power Up in our area. So our teachers went into that really challenging phase with a great skillset because of that. In terms of how I lead my staff moving forward, I'm lucky to have an incredible staff who are really supportive and we are working really hard to look at how we can continue to support each other because, probably what we've only just realised is that we might not have spent the time that we needed to processing what happened through the bushfire, so the Phoenix conference is an opportunity for me to reassess as a leader.

 

Leah Martin:

What we do to revisit that, we all had to put aside the work we were doing because of COVID. So coming to this conference is an opportunity I think, for us to work together as principals and we're lucky to have most of our principal network here... our learning community. There's lots of conversations about how we can work together between and across schools to support each other and to share that skillset. That's just one little thing that we're looking at. But yeah, there's a lot of inspiration here and a lot of ideas so, really looking forward to that kind of re-ignition of energy.

 

Yvette Poshoglian:

Do you have a personal favorite tool or platform that you use, that you recommend or that you champion?

 

Leah Martin:

I am a massive Google fan. We already were very into using Google Drive as a staff in terms of communication and our whole school went onto Google Classroom last year. So Google Classroom is definitely my favorite tool in terms of how we work as a school and we've even used it for staff professional learning. We've made the staff, students in our Google Classroom and we use it really effectively to deliver professional learning as a school. So yes, definitely Google.

 

Yvette Poshoglian:

Oh thanks Leah. That's great.

 

Yvette Poshoglian:

All right, I'm with Terry Jackson from Grafton area. Terry, can you tell me a little bit about your role in Grafton and also what brings you to this conference?

 

Terry Jackson:

So my role in Grafton is that I'm a school counselor. My main base school that I work from is Grafton Public School. So Grafton Public School during the bushfires was a local primary school that welcomed in some other bushfire impacted primary schools that couldn't access their school so the children could come to school and be in a stable environment all together. Because that's what they wanted to be.

 

Yvette Poshoglian:

And you've alluded to having a special team member that you work with. Can you tell us a bit about him?

 

Terry Jackson:

So through my role as a Psychologist, I've trained up a therapy dog who actually works to do Psychotherapy with me. He works at school with me and during the bushfires, it was really great to have him around. So the students that were new to our space, they could work with him and experience that human animal bond that helped them to relax and helps them with all of those worries that they had.

 

Yvette Poshoglian:

Because he is Murphy who is a Canine Therapist.

 

Terry Jackson:

Murphy is a Canine Therapist. He's got all of his qualifications and he had to go to therapy school and all of that sort of stuff. So yes, that's what he does. And also, it was just so great for the kids to have a different person to relate to through that experience. So they were able to go out and throw the ball with him and play soccer with him and play and relax.

 

Yvette Poshoglian:

Incredible. And you've actually worked with a couple of schools that were severely affected by the bushfires. Is that a work in progress? How is today useful for you to come and hear from these experts? What does it do for you in terms of your strategy and practice as well?

 

Terry Jackson:

I think coming to the Phoenix conferences has been wonderful to be able to link back up with people that we were talking with and meeting with and sometimes people that we've already spoken to over the phone that we've got support from. To meet them face to face has been really terrific. And to listen to so many other speakers about resilience and about how to lead through such diversity, it has just been really helpful to help us centre ourselves and know that we've done a good job and to get some practical tips.

 

Yvette Poshoglian:

I'm going to put you on the spot. Do you use tech much in your role or can tech be a help with the work that you do with staff and students?

 

Terry Jackson:

Now, I actually use tech quite a lot in my role. I do a lot of psychological assessments. I do a lot of them online which has been really helpful during COVID as well, because I was able to send things out to families and to parents using tech and getting information back. I use it a lot for analysing data, but I also... Yeah. Accessing students, for them to be able to interact with people using Tele psychology, Telehealth, so much tech was used through that. And I'm hoping it will continue. It's such a great platform to be able to access.

 

Yvette Poshoglian:

And we're grateful for the work that you do. And I'm going to come back to you and talk to you about Murphy. He sounds like a star, thank you.

 

Terry Jackson:

He is a star thank you.

 

Yvette Poshoglian:

All right I'm with the honorable Sarah Mitchell, our Minister for Education and Early Childhood. Minister, how has today been and how important is it for our senior leaders to get together like this and talk about what's happened in the past 18 months?

 

Sarah Mitchell:

Look it's just been so fantastic to have everybody in the room together and I think... For a lot of these school communities I've been able to visit them and spend some time with them. But of course COVID has made that really difficult, particularly last year. And I think just for everyone to get together in person to make those connections, there's a lot of existing relationships but to strengthen that. And also I think for our school leaders, our principals, our school support staff, to know that there's a lot of support for them from the department and from me as Minister and from the Government and that will keep continuing. I said today, there's no end date on recovery and I really believe that and we need to make sure we're supporting our schools now and in the coming months and years as they need it.

 

Yvette Poshoglian:

And from that gamut, from say well-being right through to learning, how can technology support our school leaders do you think and what role do you think it could play?

 

Sarah Mitchell:

Yeah look, I think it's interesting. And I think even now compared to say where we were 12 months ago, having the experience of the COVID pandemic as well, learning from home... I think all of us, myself included are much better at Zoom and Teams and all the online platforms for meeting so. I think there's been an increase in the use of technology because we've had to. But I think that shown how quickly schools can adapt to using technology and I think it's important not just in teaching and learning, but as you saying, well-being. Being able to have sort of virtual opportunities for support for our students, for our staff. I think it's exciting and it's a good opportunity to find the silver lining in the cloud that has been COVID and a lot of the other challenges our school communities have had. Let's use technology to bridge that gap and support each other.

 

Joachim Cohen:

Golly Yvette, you sure got some amazing people on the end of your microphone. There were some amazing stories of success, of determination, of compassion and grief. This school is truly a hub of the communities in which they sit and the principals and teachers, the glue that binds.

 

Linda Lazenby:

Absolutely. There were some really awesome uses of technology to build back better and provide an opportunity to reflect and to tell others about their experiences.

 

Joachim Cohen:

Yes and it was supreme to hear such a powerful message from the Education Minister, the honorable Sarah Mitchell. The most important part of the New South Wales Department of Education, every school and office is the passionate people that are driven every day to make a difference. We here at the Virtual Staffroom are very honored and privileged to have been able to capture those voices, experiences, stories and reflections. Thanks so much Yvette. But now it's time to welcome the Executive Director of the Bushfire Relief Strategy, Kathy Powzun to the Virtual Staffroom.

 

Kathy Powzun:

Thank you Joe, it's a real pleasure to be here. Thanks again.

 

Yvette Poshoglian:

Hi Kathy, it's Yvette. I was wondering if you could tell us a little bit about your role as the Exec Director in charge of Bushfire Relief Strategy. What is the role about and how have you interpreted it in your way and what does it encompass?

 

Kathy Powzun:

It's a really good question Yvette. Well, from day one it was clear that we needed to provide immediate support to those who were impacted by bushfires. For many after years of drought. And I saw it as essential to visit as many learning communities myself and to hear stories directly to ensure our support and recovery efforts were contextually fitting for each circumstance. The role and the work of the team has evolved over the course of the 18 months. Not to mention the fact that many of our schools have since been struck with further devastation including floods, as well as disruptions due to the pandemic. And at all times we've been looking to the future and how to ensure that whole of system changes are rapid and effective. And our direct experiences have really informed the development of the Bushfire Relief Strategy framework.

 

Kathy Powzun:

Above all, I have to say our focus has always been the students who are at the centre of all that we do and the well-being of the people who provide excellent education for our students come what may. You've heard me mention the importance of human capital and like other capital human capital grows through investment and that investment in our context is education. And I see that as the core of our individual and our collective work. Years of drought, then catastrophic fires for many floods, for all of us the global pandemic and now in 2021, further floods not to mention the mice plague and the mosquito infestation, any of these events is significant. Having to endure them one after another has really taken a heavy toll on all of us. And what has become very apparent for me as Executive Director of the Bushfire Relief Strategy, is the need to orchestrate the efforts of everybody to ensure that we optimise outcomes so that we can continue to provide that contextual support.

 

Linda Lazenby:

That's so important and you know, we've been listening at the conference to some of the experiences and reflections of school leaders and community leaders who were impacted by all of the events of the last few years that you just covered. Do you have any stories from your experiences that you'd like to share with us?

 

Kathy Powzun:

There are so many stories Yvette and they will stay with me. As you'll appreciate, the story shared by colleagues are theirs to tell. And I'm really pleased that many of our colleagues have been willing to contribute to this podcast today.

 

Yvette Poshoglian:

Kathy I know as well that you have a very personal story that we'd love you to share with us about how the events of 2019 and 2020 and even into this year have affected you.

 

Kathy Powzun:

Yeah, you're spot on. One experience I had triggered a long buried memory of mine when I was 11 and my family home was burned down. What's interesting is the love that surrounded me by my family. Perhaps that's what it was that protected me. But what this taught me was that traumatic events can live with us for decades. There is no end date to recovery. Almost 40 years on, it was one interaction with one person that took me back to the 11 year old me.

 

Yvette Poshoglian:

That's just incredibly close to home there Kathy.

 

Joachim Cohen:

Absolutely. And I know going on to that was what inspired each and every one of us at the conference was the stories. Not only of reflection, but of determination and candotivity. Do you have a story of building back that warms your heart?

 

Kathy Powzun:

I have to say Joe, I love that word. Candoitivity!

 

Kathy Powzun:

There are so many stories. But front of mind of course are those learning communities who have recently faced floods. Even after all the adversity of 2020, there were some staff members and families who were living in temporary accommodation and have now lost even that. One heartwarming story I have to say is the publication of The Little Lady. And it was written by a year five student at Bobin Public School and illustrated by many of her fellow students. And as you all know, Bobin Public School was one of the schools we lost and was rebuilt in record time along with Wytaliba Public School. So I'd have to say the publication of The Little Lady is one that really warms my heart.

 

Linda Lazenby:

Now resilience is a word Kathy that we've heard a lot during the conference and we hear a lot in education. What has resilience taught you in how you and others can approach adversity and I suppose leading this as well?

 

Kathy Powzun:

Yeah. It's a really good question and resilience is a term that is being used probably more often than what we had heard at previously or prior to the bushfires. But one of the key messages from Shane Fitzsimmons, Commissioner of Resilience New South Wales, is that resilience is a word often used. And his definition which really resonates with me, is that resilience is learning through lived experience. A good lesson for us all is that we shouldn't aim to bounce back to normal. And I say normal in inverted commas. We need to move forward embracing our new circumstances. Personally, I'm of the view that we as adults can learn from student voice as they share their experiences, their vision and their hopes for the future.

 

Yvette Poshoglian:

Kathy, the recent Phoenix conference was an incredible gathering ground of stories and a place of sharing stories of resilience from those school leaders, from other team members as well. What role does that play? How important is it to share those stories?

 

Kathy Powzun:

The stories we've heard have included stories of resilience, but I want to acknowledge that we are here to listen to all stories of adversity, loss, grief, as well as stories of initiative, bravery and resilience. What I've learned through being a part of the work that we've led, is that everyone's journey is so different.

 

Yvette Poshoglian:

Indeed. I think all those stories are worth hearing and worth sharing and will help us all move forward. I suppose one of the things that we got to hear as well from the people gathered at the conference was about that idea of self care, which you just touched on in sharing those stories. This podcast has a technology focus. Is there something that you think about technology that could help bring us together or bring those kinds of schools together? What role can tech play in helping these communities build back better?

 

Kathy Powzun:

What I would have to say is technology in the first instance proved to be a sticking point for many of our communities where telecommunications infrastructure was fractured. Health and safety had been instrumental in leading the trial of the secured comms app for schools which were impacted by fires. A recent review of that endorsed the further 12 months of trialing this method of communicating in extraordinary circumstances. But to your question, what role do I see technology playing in helping these communities? 2020 was the year where we were all having to be agile in our use of technology. Sensitive to the communities who continue to have limited access, I'll be interested to see how technology will continue to evolve as we explore it's potential and better equip our more remote learning communities. And it was wonderful to have you all in attendance at the Phoenix conference and demonstrate to our leaders in schools how effective and engaging various technologies can be to bring learnings to life.

 

Joachim Cohen:

Yeah absolutely. I 100% can hear that. It's such an amazing way to tell stories I think with technology these days and to be able to spread it like we're doing here, so that everyone who wasn't even able to attend the conference is able to go on their own journey of reflection. And we are a technology podcast, that is for sure. And is there a piece of technology that you found essential during the recent events or afterwards?

 

Kathy Powzun:

I'd have to say my mobile phone Joe.

 

Joachim Cohen:

Absolutely hey? Yeah, yeah.

 

Kathy Powzun:

Me personally, my mobile phone. But it doesn't have to be an electronic device. What I think I've really taken away is how important the human element to the work that we do is. It's really the connections that have been forged and being in tune to what the needs are on the ground. Because as far as technology goes, if we use this as an example, it differs for different people and it's really being an active listener and drawing upon what it is people need most and responding to that.

 

Joachim Cohen:

Yeah, absolutely you're right. It certainly is a mix. It's a mix of what's needed and that's what's important, that's for sure. And what we're going to do, we want you to step in the time machine now. If we could take you back to before those fires and floods, and maybe that's now. What's one piece of advice you'd give yourself and other school leaders?

 

Kathy Powzun:

I would have to say it would be to value the connections we all have within our families, our communities, our professional lives and also be familiar with the structures and the systems that are our safety nets that we rely on during such times. I'd have to say that that's a real standout for me. The connections.

 

Linda Lazenby:

And then when we look forward Kathy, what's the message you would like to pass on to school communities who have been affected by 2019, 2020 and this year as well?

 

Kathy Powzun:

The message is every school community matters. Big and small, near and far. And I'm just in awe of the dedication that has been exhibited. I salute the commitment to all leaders and those who were a part of our communities who continue to provide the best possible learning experiences for each and every one of our students. I can say that having led a school community during fires, floods and a pandemic, our people know that they have the strengths that they can draw upon in the years to come. And nobody could have anticipated the adversity that they've all faced. Know that the department's working hard to learn from these experiences and we continue to have this at the forefront of our minds as a central body of work. But we want to ensure that we really position people to be successful, safe and thrive in days and years ahead.

 

Joachim Cohen:

Wow Kathy, you and your team have just done such an amazing job. You've brought people back together, you've given them such an opportunity to reflect and to evaluate and build back stronger. But, it's time to have some fun on the Virtual Staffroom Podcast. We don't let any guest go without completing one question which we call rocket, ship, robots. Now this wasn't in your script. So you have to transport yourself over to the UK, there's a great podcast where they challenge the guests to choose their favorite disk that they would take with them to a desert island and play there. But we're a technology podcast so we're not taking a disk, we're taking a piece of technology and we're taking it into outer space. So what would you take with you on the rocket ship?

 

Kathy Powzun:

My mobile phone Joe.

 

Linda Lazenby:

You're not alone.

 

Joachim Cohen:

Exactly, exactly. I think just about every one of our guests goes straight with the mobile phone.

 

Kathy Powzun:

Why do I say the mobile phone? I can listen to my podcasts, I can listen to music, I can text my family, I can look at images that have formed memories for me. There are so many reasons as to why I'd take my mobile phone.

 

Joachim Cohen:

Yes as Linda said, you're not alone. Hey Linda?

 

Linda Lazenby:

Absolutely.

 

Joachim Cohen:

That's for sure.

 

Joachim Cohen:

Kathy, thank you so much for all you do.

 

Kathy Powzun:

No, thank you. No, thank you.

 

Joachim Cohen:

It's been a pleasure. Thanks for speaking with us here on the Virtual Staffroom.

 

Kathy Powzun:

No, thank you very much. And I just want to acknowledge your work and the team's work. And also acknowledge... Our former Secretary would say that there are two jobs. Those who teach and those who support those who teach. I really take my hat off to all those that support our teachers in being the best people standing before our greatest asset and that being our children. So thanks.

 

Joachim Cohen:

Thank you, Kathy.

 

Joachim Cohen:

So were you blown away by so many stories of resilience, so much candoitivity and compassion? I know we were. But now, it's over to us. How can technology help empower our student storytellers. Give them a chance to reflect, process, make history and build back better? We were lucky enough to be at the conference and present a workshop to teachers and here are some of the top tools we shared. Linda, what have you got?

 

Linda Lazenby:

Well two of the things that we shared were our student podcaster and student filmmaker modules for the product that is self-paced and allows teachers to guide their students through that learning. It really allows kids to capture their stories and share them with an audience which, we know is a very powerful tool in this recovery process for our schools and our students. One of the stories that I have come across through a good friend of mine who has a daughter at Cobargo Public School is a story they published together the year five and six students called The day she stole the sun. And they've published that and they're selling it in their local community and beyond. And I think for those students to go through that experience of sharing I suppose what their experience was with others, has been really, really important. And I think if we use things like podcasting and filmmaking to allow our students to share what their life experience has been, it's just a really critical part to recovery.

 

Joachim Cohen:

Yeah, I really agree. There's so much planning involved in creating a podcast or creating a film and those resources really walk students through that so it takes the fear away from the teacher. isn't that Right? Yeah, really. Well yeah it really, really helps.

 

Joachim Cohen:

Oh, what about me? I am so excited. We did launch an edition of the T4L Kids Magazine when we were at the conference. And that's because it's got such great relevance to a lot of the areas in which these schools were. Because it's all about finding a conservation issue that students can identify and then helping to communicate it and get action happening about it. So a lot of these communities might want to regenerate an area, maybe there's an endangered animal. And this resource walks them through identifying the issue, researching it, finding a way that they can improve it or make it better and then communicating it out to their audience. So I think it's a really great resource to investigate.

 

Linda Lazenby:

Yeah and so powerful when they feel as though there's something productive they can do to support their community. Really, really fantastic.

 

Joachim Cohen:

It's all about building back better. And can I share one more?

 

Linda Lazenby:

Yep.

 

Joachim Cohen:

That's Google Earth TimeLapse. This might not apply to any of the areas that necessarily those students might be in, but it's a global perspective that can even take a little bit of a local look. And it helps students to see how the world's changed using satellite photography that Google have gathered over the last 25 years. Might spark a lot of thought and spark a lot of action and it's a great little compliment to T4L kids magazine.

 

Linda Lazenby:

Very clever.

 

Joachim Cohen:

So as our avid listeners will know, we love to give you a voice to close us out. But this episode, instead of a tip of techno wizardry wisdom, we want to encourage you to jump straight out and access a rather awesome reflection and story writing tool. And that is Everyone's an Author. Where you hear from the Virtual Staffroom's own Yvette Poshoglian, as well as many other amazing Australian authors. Plus, there are some game-changing digital journals to get your students reflecting, writing and creating digitally. The perfect way to start tomorrow, capture history and give your students the chance to reflect on the challenging year 2020 was and 2021 has been.

 

Joachim Cohen:

So are you inspired by all the amazing stories from today? I know we were. We want to finish today by saying a huge thank you and giving a virtual elbow bump to all the teachers, the leaders, the communities and the students in all the New South Wales public schools affected by the bushfires, the floods and other events of the last few years. Your resilience, your determination and your candoitivity inspired every member of the Virtual Staffroom team. And I'm sure every one of our listeners has your communities in their thoughts.

 

Yvette Poshoglian:

Just a little note, please be aware that all views expressed by the podcast presenters, that's us, are our personal opinions and not representative of the New South Wales Department of Education. Discussions aren't endorsements of third party products, services or events. And please note that as much as we sound like it, we are not experts in legal ease, tech speak or anything in between. We're just passionate people keen to boost technology for learning in the classroom and to help build the skills in your students and for you to solve the problems of tomorrow. Do your due diligence, read further and if we've got something wrong, let us know. We too are always learning and always improving.

 

Joachim Cohen:

This podcast has been produced by the masterful Jacob Druce with the assistance and supreme coordination of many more awesome members of the T4 all team. Before we go, please make sure you send us through your comments, your word of techno wizardry wisdom and your thoughts for new guests and segments. And if you liked the podcast, give us a rating so more and more educators find us and be inspired to get a little techie in the classroom. Stay resilient, stay curious, stay compassionate everyone. And thanks for joining us.